Album: Zahra Fugues
Author: Rigobert Dittmann
Publication: Bad Alchemy
Date: 12/22/2009

ROTHKAMM Zahra Fugues (Flux Records, FLX12): The second part of Frank Rothkamms "Tetralogy" -- the first part "Ghost of New York" was already mentioned in BA64 -- is, as usual, a pleasure even if considered only philosophically. Some of it is difficult to understand, some of it is hard to believe, and sometimes it helps to just laugh. Kant is quoted again, Leibniz's monad is referenced, and Plato's anamnesis is mentioned (Idea View as Memory). He uses his "Platonic" recording technique, or the "Platonic art head": Three microphones positioned in a perfect triangle. What is truly remarkable is that this is Rothkamm's first non-electronic music in over 25 years. It is pure piano music, the fugues are played purely from memory (anamnestic) and came to him like flying birds. Well, the windows were open (during recording) as one hears the Upper East Side outside. I hereby quote -- wishing to say nothing wrong -- Rothkamm's description of his Fugue Principle: "The fugues, for 4 independent monophonic voices realized by an 8-armed pianist, fly around the very definition of a fugue through the baroque concept of pure ornamentation vs. cantus firmus (fixed song). Independent from each other, like Leibniz' monads, the 4 voices' tempi micro-fluctuate around linear time and macro-oscillate stylistically through the centuries around historical time." The fugues, 26 in number, Op. 441-474, are each like the short flights of birds, like memory and know-how and take similar liberties like Glenn Gould's Goldberg Variations. This is especially true in regard to anachronisms: the master of the fugue, Bach, becomes a contemporary of Haydn (Op. 456), Deep Purple (Op. 462), and again Nancarrow. All this is as virtuosic as it is bird-y, a bird of paradise even, while at the same time so smart that I forget my aversion towards baroque fugue magic. This is someone who could say that music lies down at his feet and eats out of his hand. [BA 65 rbd]

-- original German --

ROTHKAMM Zahra Fugues (Flux Records, FLX12): Der zweite Teil von Frank Rothkamms "Tetralogy" - vom Auftakt Ghost of New York war in BA 64 schon die Rede - ist, wie gewohnt, allein schon philosophisch betrachtet ein Vergnügen. Vieles übersteigt den Verstand, manches ist kaum zu glauben, manchmal hilft nur Lachen. Wieder wird Kant zitiert, die Leipnizsche Monade bemüht und Platons Anamnesis (Ideenschau als Erinnerung). "Platonisch" ist auch das Aufnahmeverfahren des "Platonischen Kunstkopfs" über drei Mikrophone in perfekter Dreiecksposition. Bemerkenswert ist aber nicht zuletzt, dass hier Rothkamms erste nicht-elektronische Musik seit 25 Jahren vorliegt. Es ist pure Pianomusik, rein aus dem Gedächtnis (anamnetisch) gespielte Fugen, die ihm zuflogen wie Vögel. Das Fenster steht ja auch offen, man hört die Upper East Side draußen. Ich zitiere, um nichts Falsches zu sagen, Rothkamms Beschreibung seines Fugenprinzips: The fugues, for 4 independent monophonic voices realized by an 8-armed pianist, fly around the very definition of a fugue through the baroque concept of pure ornamentation vs. cantus firmus. Independent from each other, like Leipniz" monads, the 4 voices" tempi micro-fluctuate around linear time and macro-oscillate stylistically through the centuries around historical time. Die Fugen, 26 an der Zahl, Op. 441-474, allesamt nur kurze Flüge der Vögel der Erinnerung und des Knowhows, nehmen sich also mindestens die Freiheiten, die Glenn Gould sich mit den Goldberg Variationen erlaubte. Speziell was Anachronismen angeht. Der Fugenmeister Bach wird zu einem Zeitgenossen von Haydn (op. 456), Deep Purple (op. 462), immer wieder Nancarrow. Das ist so virtuos wie vogelig, paradiesvogelig sogar und dabei so pfiffig, dass ich meine Aversion gegen barocken Fugenzauber vergesse. Da ist einer, der von sich sagen könnte, dass die Musik sich niedersetzt auf seinen Fuß und ihm aus der Hand frisst. [BA 65 rbd]

[ Permalink: http://rothkamm.com?review.cfm?ID=149 ]